Method of Loci

Cicero Denounces Catiline by Maccari

The method of loci is a memory technique used in ancient Greece and Rome where you imagine a building, and mentally place the items you must remember at locations in the building. Then later you recall these items as you mentally walk through the building and view them in the locations you pass. As this New York Times article on the method of loci describes, the first known published description of this method was in Rhetorica ad Herennium in 80 B.C.  Cicero also describes this method in his work De Oratore.

A study of the method of loci published in March 2017 by scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, the Donders Institute, and Stanford University on the effectiveness of the method of loci showed this technique results in significant recall improvement across time periods of twenty minutes, one day, and four months. Even after four months, the group using the method of loci had more than a 20% level of improvement in recall over the active and passive control groups.

The study included using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the subjects, and then comparing their before and after MRIs with memory athletes. They found the method of loci subject’s connections across brain centers came to resemble the memory athlete’s. In their study they show with a figure of the brain’s MRI connections the noticeable difference in connections between memory athletes and controls and indicate this improvement from using the method of loci may result from improved connections (links) across brain areas.

Using Loci, you link in your mind. You place nodes with camera or file images, web links, or text at locations in your home and office. You can link them to form mind map graphs or you can leave them unattached as a form of pinned note. In either case you have placed them in a location, reinforcing your memory of them for recall at any time, even when not using the Loci application. Furthermore, you can share your mind map graphs with others, taking the method of loci from one person’s internal thoughts to an external visualization that can be communicated digitally with other contributors.

Keith Boesky of ODG emphasizes AR Data Visualization

At AWE 2017 Keith Boesky states, “This is a huge one for me, Data Visualization. How much more do you see when you go to a 3D model on your screen than a flat screen?  How much more are you going to see when you’re able to put your glasses on with full awareness of what’s around you, with full awareness of everybody in the room with you, and be able to walk amongst your data set? I think that’s huge! I think it is going to change things as much is the spreadsheet did.

 

AWE 2017 Notes

From 31 May to 2 June the Augmented World Expo was held at the Santa Clara Convention center.  There were a lot of interesting things there, and we are providing some notes here.

Videos of AWE 2017 talks are available on the AWE page on Youtube.

Of course, we think one interesting thing was our booth 359 showing off our new product, Loci, available for HoloLens now in the windows store.   We showed visitors how their notes, ideas, and analysis can be placed in the real world, to increase understanding and recall as they solve their problems.

Congratulations to Microsoft HoloLens for winning the Best Headworn Device award, as selected by the IEEE Standards Association!

I liked the talk by Tony Parisi of Unity.  Tony worked in the early days of VR, on the VRML standard.  Two billion devices have unity player installed.  He gives a good survey of what is going on across companies in mixed reality.  Mentioned WebAR, with the world as your QR code.

https://youtu.be/NaPY_9l6JGs

There are some good ideas for interaction from Meta, which makes the Meta 2 headset

Stefano Baldassi on Meta interaction https://youtu.be/b2PgbMs2UVA

We will add more to this blog post as we assess the talks…

 

Yarn and Photos In Movies and TV

Loci can be used for many things since it is for general analysis.

Analysis in Movies and TV often involves links of string or yarn, pictures of people and maps, all of which are possible using Loci, and since Loci is digital, you can modify them easily, move them, and use the same space for different versions.

One example of red yarn on physical objects and miniatures on TV is the opening credits for the 11.22.63 series.  Another is the opening credits for Person of Interest.

The Big Board
String Theory
Crime Map

Graphs

Loci is a general graph editor that supports mind map graphs. Graphs consist of nodes and edges. We call nodes with locations loci, and edges associating loci we call links.

node + location in real world = locus (loci is plural)
edge = relation = association = link

Many items in life can be understood using graphs. From molecules to web page links to friends of your friends, you can think of things as the nodes, and relations between them as the links.

Graphs are used in mathematics, physics, and informatics as underlying representations for solving problems.  Graph data structures are used for 3D games to manage the application of transformations, and Loci itself uses such a scene graph to draw all the things it shows.

Most mind map software requires a central concept node, and links to other nodes, with no node being unlinked, and all being directly, or indirectly connected to the central node.  Loci does not require that.   Nodes can be solitary, or multiply connected.   In this way we support the analysis process from end to end.   You can make unlinked notes for things as you observe them, or your ideas as you come upon them, then orient your thoughts by linking them together to make sense of them.